What Were you Thinking?

Each student is given a sheet of paper and a pencil. There is to be absolutely no talking (or else they start giving clues to each other about what they will write) and no looking at a neighbor’s paper. Explain to the students that you will give a SM reference and they are to write down any 5 words from that scripture. No using scriptures or cards or bookmarks, etc. Explain that the object is to write down words that you think everyone else in the room will also write down. Again make sure no one makes comments here or asks questions, or it might clue the other students into how they are thinking (i.e. “Can I write the first 5 words?” “Can I write the magic square rhyme?” These kinds of comments will spoil the game, so don’t allow questions or comments; make them figure this type of thing as the game goes on.) If someone tries to say something, I just quiet them and ask them to wait until after the first round is done, and then if they don’t understand I’ll take their question.

Give the first SM reference and wait a minute for everyone to write down 5 words. When everyone is done, start with one person and have him read off his first word. Have everyone that has that word written down on their paper to raise their hand (including the reader). Count how many hands are raised and everyone that wrote down that word gets that many points. (Have them write the point value next to their word).

A second word is read from the student’s list, and the points are tallied again for that word. Continue through all the words that anyone wrote down. (If only one student wrote that particular word, then he gets one point for it.) Have each student total the point values for their five words together and the highest score wins.

Afterthought: You would hope that the key words would be written down, but sometimes the students are thinking alike and will write “the” “a” etc. The game still works, and in fact, sometimes those words are the big point scorers. If after a few rounds, the kids all start writing insignificant words, then you may have to say they can’t use them, or require that they write down words with at least 4 letters.