Cat and Mouse

Have each student tie a large pompom onto an 18” length of yarn (these are the mice). Grab a large sauce pan lid (this is the cat). Have the students sit in a circle on the floor with their mice in the center in a pile and the “tails” (yarn) trailing out in front of them (this looks like the hub of a wheel with spokes protruding from it).

Each student will get a turn at being the cat (who sits near the center). The teacher calls out a SM clue and all students try to locate it, including the cat. When they find the scripture, they quickly grab hold of the tail of their mouse and pull their mouse out of the circle. As soon as the cat finds the scripture, he grabs the lid and smacks it down over any remaining mice in the center.

Variation: Give each student 10 tootsie rolls and whenever their mouse is caught they have to give the cat a candy.

UPDATED:

I (Jenny) did this in my class today for March Madness.  It was a hit!  I did a few things differently:

I made the pom poms out of yarn ahead of time.  It took about 45 minutes to make 16 out of some junk yarn I had around. I didn’t bother with the cardboard circlemethod that gets the cute perfect version — I just wrapped the yarn around my hand and made some wild looking mice.  I also left the string about 2.5 feet long.  I have a big class, and this way everyone can sit in a circle and reach.

Because this was March Madness, we played in teams. It took everyone a few rounds to come up with a strategy (if the cat is on your team, chase slowly; if the cat is the other team, chase fast!).  It was sort of funny to watch them figure it out.  Or not. cheeky  After it was clear everyone had it, I told them I would start subtracting points for team members trapped by the cat. 

We played for points, not candy.  The kids still liked it.

I used a clear glass lid with a lip.  Mice couldn’t be pulled out past the lip, which the kids thought was funny, and the clear top made it easy to count up the points.

I read the entire scripture mastery verse and then the reference so that everyone could look even if they didn’t know the passage.

We all sat in a circle.  The cat didn’t sit any closer or farther than the others.

This game is easy to adapt to groups and all of my students actually liked it!  Now I’ve got several “mice” made up, and we can play it again and again!

Free Instant Download