Pretzel: A Reminder of Prayer

You can either read the following quote in class and/or tie it to each pretzel as a hand out: In about 610 A.D. a very creative Alpine Monk decided to make use of the pieces of dough left over from baking bread. The Monk formed them into thin strips folded into a looped twist to represent the folded arms of children in prayer. This scrumptious treat was given to the children as they learned their prayers. They began calling the treat “Pretiola”, which is Latin for “little reward”. Soon it was known the world over as a pretzel. The secret of making great pretzels is not only in the baking but also in the shaping. We, like pretzels, are made from the best ingredients, by the best hands available, the hands of our Father in Heaven. Have you ever seen a broken pretzel, or one that’s lost its shape? We too, can lose our shape when we don’t pray always to keep our spirituality intact. Even in the midst of our greatest trials, we must remember, as did Job, to call on the Lord. The simple shape of the pretzel, arms folded in prayer, reminds us to pray each day. Our “Pretiola” or “little rewards” are the blessings we receive. Every time you see a pretzel, remember prayer. Check to see if your arms are often folded in prayer and have not lost their shape. (You can make them large like the ones sold at Pretzel stands, or a bunch of small ones if you have a large primary/Sunday school class.)